thekyriarchywontfuckitself

d0gbl0g:

manas-rs:

poppypicklesticks:

anotherstarinthesky:

empresspinto:

nigga-chan:

People need to realize the significance of this post, because when I reblogged it it was just blank so I think some people may not understand what this is trying to say

Adopting an animal (or buying from someone close to you who has recently had puppies, kittens, etc) is not like simply going to the store and buying a toy. You do not just get to throw it away once you are done with it and it stops being cute in your eyes

This is a real living thing that has emotions, needs, and wants, not something to be thrown away when YOU are done after YOU entered at commitment to raise and care for this animal. 

What’s just as bad as dumping the animal off just anywhere you want, whether it be on the side of the road or in a shelter, is that a lot of these animals end up dying after that. Animals are NOT always adopted and strays are not always picked up. Animals can get put down, run over, tortured, and a list of other things 

People should really think about what they are responsible for before they bring an animal into their life

Not to mention that that animal loves you, you are his world, and when you drop him off at the shelter - or worse, in the street - you are abandoning him. He doesn’t know what he did wrong, he thinks you’ll come back, maybe you just dropped him off for a bit and you’ll come back to him.
Not only did you make a commitment, but that animal loves you and throwing them away isn’t just breaking that commitment, it’s throwing away someone who doesn’t understand why you don’t love him anymore and where you went.

This is so important. Animals are NOT toys you just can’t return them because you got bored. Think first before you buy a cute little puppy for your stupid girlfriend or sister or whatever. Okay. This just make me so mad that I can’t keep talking about it. Seriously you have no heart if you do this. Seriously

This shit pisses me off

How could you be so hateful to that poor puppy who loves you 

Not rs but this one of those things that’s just important enough. Animals depend on you, they love you, their entire world revolves around you

It’s a commitment. Once you make it, see it through

:’(

lacigreen

ludicrouscupcake:

poppy-the-knight:

sourcedumal:

I Love My Boo campaign features real young men of color loving each other passionately. Rather than sexualizing gay relationships, this campaign models caring, and highlights the importance of us taking care of each other. Featured throughout New York City, I Love My Boo directly challenges homophobia and encourages all who come across it to critically rethink our notion of love.

GMHC is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected.

this is fucking adorable

SPREAD THESE IMAGES LIKE WILDFIRE PRECISELY BECAUSE THEY FUCK UP THE MISGUIDED STEREOTYPES WE ALL ARE USED TO SEEING.

martininamerica
blackqueerboi

afro-dominicano:

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Extended trailer for the documentary Negrita.

From the film’s Official WordPress:

NEGRITA, written and directed by Magdalena Albizu, is a documentary about the  Afro-Latina identity and experience in the United States.

Black Latinos/as are often overlooked or dichotomized as either “black” or “hispanic” in the United States.  However, according to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) , Hispanic or Latino origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. Hispanic or Latino origin is independent of race and is termed “ethnicity” by the United States Census Bureau.

NEGRITA highlights individual unique Afro-Latina experiences within a broad range of skin color and ethnicity across the United States, while revealing psychological and social factors that add to the confusion, uncertainty, shame and affirmation about one’s self-image of being both “Black”and “Latina”.

NEGRITA aims to establish a ‘black’ consciousness across all generations by reigniting a movement to embrace Latinos’ African roots through a trans-national dialogue on race, identity, ethnicity, nationality and community-building.

Negrita is currently set to be completed September, 2014.

Donate online: http://negritadocumentary.wordpress.com/donate
Website: www.negritadocumentary.com
Follow: @NegritaDoc on Twitter and Facebook

Please boost or donate or both, whatever you can do, do it!

intersectionalfeminism

journolist:

'We're a Movement Now': Fast Food Workers Strike in 150 Cities (NBC News)

Fast food workers walked off the job nationwide on Thursday, as police arrested dozens who engaged in civil disobedience. Organizers said workers in an estimated 150 cities were expected to take part in the strike, which they said marked an intensification of their two-year campaign to raise hourly pay in the industry to $15 and to win workers’ right to form a union. Organizers said dozens of workers had been arrested in cities including Kansas City, Detroit, and New York.

Fast-Food Workers Turn Up the Heat (In These Times)

“Paddy wagon’s on its way,” announced a Chicago Police tactical officer over his radio early this morning. Shortly thereafter, a crowd of about 300 demonstrators—including over 100 striking fast food workers—began chanting “Take the street!” and proceeded to do just that. Marching between a McDonald’s on one side of the road and a Burger King on the other, the crowd blocked 87th street traffic on Chicago’s south side for about 20 minutes. The action was the latest escalation in the fast-food workers’ campaign for a $15 minimum hourly wage and the right to form a union without retaliation. Two dozen workers proceeded to link arms and sit down in the road in an act of civil disobedience, prompting the police to take them away in handcuffs.

Hundreds of Fast-Food Workers Striking for Higher Wages Are Arrested (New York Times) 

Hundreds of fast-food workers and labor allies demanding a $15-an-hour wage were arrested in sit-ins around the country on Thursday, as the protesters used civil disobedience to call attention to their cause. Organizers said nearly 500 protesters were arrested in three dozen cities — including Chicago, Detroit, Las Vegas, New York and Little Rock, Ark. All told, the sit-ins took place in about 150 cities nationwide, the organizers said.

Arrests as Fast Food Workers Strike Across the Country for $15 an Hour (Newsweek)

Thousands of workers at fast food restaurants across the country went on strike Thursday, demanding better wages and the right to unionize without retaliation. Organizers said strikes would take place is around 150 cities and would include workers from McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, KFC, and more. In addition to the right to unionize, workers are demanding a $15 hourly wage. “There has to be civil disobedience because workers don’t see any other way to get $15 an hour and a union,” Kendall Fells, organizing director of the organizing group Fast Food Forward.

50 arrested in local fast-food wage protests (Chicago Tribune) 

Hundreds of fast-food workers held strikes and protests in Chicago and other U.S. cities Thursday, the latest step in their push for a $15 hourly wage. In the Chicago area, 50 were handcuffed and taken into custody in two separate events, one in the city’s Chatham neighborhood and one in Cicero. Cicero charged the protestors with disrupting traffic, a misdemeanor, while Chicago issued citations to the 19 it detained earlier in the day. The Fight for $15 campaign said that 436 fast-food workers had been arrested nationwide as of Thursday afternoon.

Police ticket, arrest 30 Detroit fast-food protesters (Detroit Free Press)

More than 100 demonstrators shut down an east-side Detroit intersection Thursday as part of a labor-organized national fast-food strike. Detroit police said they ticketed and released 24 demonstrators for disorderly conduct and another six arrested for outstanding traffic warrants. Officers said protesters sat in the roadway at Mack Avenue and Canyon and refused to leave. The protesters blocked traffic for about a half hour, police said. “They didn’t have to leave — they just had to get out of the roadway — and they refused,” said Detroit Assistant Police Chief Steve Dolunt. “As long as you’re peaceful, we’re good, but you can’t block the roadway.”

Little Rock police arrest 11 in McDonald’s wage protest (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

Little Rock police on Thursday morning arrested 11 protesters demonstrating for higher pay for fast-food workers. Officers got a call from protesters about 8 a.m. and responded to ensure order. By that time, demonstrators were blocking the thoroughfare at Seventh and Broadway, eventually moving to Third and Broadway, where some were arrested. “To my understanding they are protesting the minimum-wage law,” Little Rock Police Department spokesman Lt. Sidney Allen said in an emailed statement. About 50 to 60 were demonstrating peacefully, Allen said.

Fast-food protests lead to 8 arrests in Wilkinsburg (Pittsburgh Business Times) 

A strike by fast-food workers seeking $15 an hour in pay has resulted in arrests in front of a McDonald’s restaurant in Wilkinsburg. Kyndall Mason, a spokesperson for One Pittsburgh, a labor support organization that’s been working with fast-food workers in their ongoing fight for higher wages in the region, said that eight protesters were arrested Thursday when they sat down on Penn Avenue in front of the restaurant, disrupting traffic. “They were arrested and taken away,” said Mason, who participated in the strike, which she said started at 5:30 a.m. “The rest of the crowd was dispersed.”

Five arrested in Houston fast food wages protest (Houston Chronicle) 

Five protesters were arrested Thursday afternoon in front of a McDonalds in Southwest Houston as part of a one-day protest in 150 cities to boost the minimum wage of fast food workers to $15 an hour. In a scene that has become increasingly familiar, Houston police were standing nearly with an armful of handcuffs and as soon as the protesters flooded into the intersection and sat down in the middle of the roadway, the police began making the arrests.

Three arrested at Denver protest outside McDonald’s (Denver Post)

Three people were arrested Thursday for blocking traffic during a demonstration in favor of paying fast-food workers $15 an hour. McDonald’s worker Christian Medina, the Rev. Patrick Demmer, the senior pastor at Graham Memorial Community Church of God in Christ, and college student Tucker Plumlee sat down in crosswalk on busy Colfax Avenue during a lunchtime protest outside a McDonald’s. They were taken into custody to cheers from around 100 protesters after police warned that they would be arrested if they refused to leave.

Fast food workers strike outside McDonald’s in Gretna, kicking off day of demonstrations (New Orleans Times-Picayune)

At 29 years old, Shaunta Richardson looks back at more than a decade of working in the fast food industry, starting when she was 16. Richardson, a Burger King cook who moved back to New Orleans from Texas this year after fleeing Hurricane Katrina nine years ago, said something is familiar between her teenage years and today — the numbers behind the dollar sign on pay day. “It seems like the checks look the same from then, to now,” Richardson said Thursday morning. Richardson joined in a rally outside McDonald’s in Gretna early Thursday morning, as strikes, demonstrations and acts of civil disobedience unfolded nationwide, part of the “Fight for $15” movement seeking $15-per-hour for fast food workers and the right to unionize, without fear of retaliation.

Charlotte fast-food workers join national protest (Charlotte Observer)

Priscilla Hoyle says she is raising her three children in a hotel room. When she’s not working three days a week at Bojangles’, she supplements her income by asking strangers for money, she said. “The only thing I can do is get out here and panhandle just to keep a roof over my children’s heads,” said Hoyle, 22. On Thursday, she joined about 20 Charlotte fast-food workers who walked off their jobs and demanded higher wages as part of a national push that featured protests in dozens of cities. 

Solidarity protest in Cleveland with home health aides leading effort (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Customers got a little something extra when they ordered from the breakfast menu at a local McDonald’s on Thursday morning. Well, the super-size portion of protest wasn’t exactly on the menu. Still, it was offered — for free — beginning at 6 a.m. to anyone within earshot of the McDonald’s on St. Clair Avenue, near East 105 Street, in the city’s Glenville neighborhood. Cleveland was one of more than 100 cities participating in the latest effort to get a $15 minimum wage for fast-food workers. Supporters in Cleveland protested in solidarity with those holding strikes for higher wages in other cities. This is Cleveland’s third protest since 2013.

Fast-food workers stage national protests for better pay (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) 

Protestors march up Ponce de Leon Avenue on the way to protest in front of a McDonald’s restaurant. Ten people were arrested for blocking Ponce de Leon Ave. as protestors participated in a nationwide protest and strike for better pay near a McDonald’s in Atlanta, Thursday afternoon September 4, 2014. Calling for higher pay and the right to form a union without retaliation, fast-food chain workers and community supporters protested as part of a wave of strikes and protests in 150 cities across the U.S.

Labor’s New Groove: Taking the Struggle From Streets to Legislatures (The American Prospect)

The campaigns for minimum-wage raises aren’t confined to Democratic strongholds, however. Initiatives that would raise the state minimum wage are on November’s ballots in Arkansas and Alaska, where they may produce the kind of working-class turnout that would help the re-election bids of Democratic Senators Mark Pryor and Mark Begich, respectively. That’s largely why Democrats gathered signatures to put the measures on the ballot. But no such Democratic strategy is responsible for the presence of such an initiative on Nebraska’s ballot this November. Quite apart from political calculation, it seems a fair number of Nebraskans just believe it’s time for a raise. Similarly, in Kentucky, a measure to enact a minimum wage ordinance is before the Louisville City Council, where it’s favored to pass.

Why Labor Matters in the Fight for Racial Justice (In These Times)

This was a period when black workers still were relegated to the most dirty, dangerous and grueling positions in industry. They were frozen out of transfers and promotions to what were considered white men’s jobs, even at union plants. But, as Fred says, “Even the worst union in the world is the best for black folks.” He explains, “For the first time, you were in an environment where you could speak against the union and against the company.” In the union, black workers had the power of collective voice, and they used it to change the union itself.

Why I Support the Fast-Food Workers Strike (The Nation)

In Washington, the agenda of corporations too often trumps the agenda of America’s middle class. Corporate leaders call and politicians answer. But when the working class calls to tell its representatives about the jobs that have disappeared because of bad trade deals or the paychecks that are smaller than they were twenty years ago, no one answers. Workers have stopped calling. They know the only way politicians see the light is if they feel the heat. Today, thousands of fast-food workers will be out in the street demanding a higher wage, dignity and the opportunity for a better life. They’re doing it because they have families to feed, parents to look after and basic needs that can’t be met at $7.25 an hour.

Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source