odinsblog

odinsblog:

ruckawriter:

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

Damn.

Well said.

We are (still) living in the age of the angry White male…who, unironically, is the beneficiary of 99.999% of society’s benefits 

fluffmugger

fluffmugger:

thebatglare:

"Girls who say they like superheroes are lying so boys will-"

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"Girls who wear superhero shirts are attention seeking they just want boys to like th-"

image

"Girls only want to go to Comic Con so they can dress slutty so boys will-"

image

"Girls who say they like anything are only trying to get boys to-"

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People so phenomenally stupid they actually think a large number of women build their entire life, interests and mode of dress around appearing pleasing to fanboys

image

odinsblog
l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

blackqueerboi

pi-ratical:

I am really, extremely, amazingly excited to announce the release of my new Hello Pronoun stickers! I posted about these on twitter last night, but I can finally talk about them at length a bit more here. 

The stickers read “Hello, address me as:_________, Please use: ________”, allowing you to declare your name of choice and preferred pronouns immediately upon meeting people. These have been my pet project over the last week or two and a lot of thought has gone into their production. The colours were specifically chosen to be nongendered - no pink or baby blue (The Ze/Hir/Hirs looks a bit blue in these pictures but is really solidly teal), They rather specifically do not read “my name is” to head off people being dicks about “Is that REALLY your name?” because frankly it doesn’t matter if it is or not because it’s what you fucking go by. (Besides which, the concept of a true name is pretty bullshit unless you’re looking into demon summoning) I feel like there are a lot of great potential uses for these! They’d be great at school LGBT-club meetings or other large gatherings where you’re likely to meet a lot of new people, like conventions. They can be used right after coming out to help people who’ve known you for a while adapt to your new name/pronouns. If you’re genderfluid, you can use them to declare your preference on any particular day (and I’m looking into some more permanent buttons that’d make this much easier). They can even be used to remind that one old friend who can never get your damn pronouns right. Overall, it seems like these’ll be a wonderfully useful thing for folks under the trans* umbrella to have around and I’m really happy to have made them.

Obviously I couldn’t cover every pronoun variation/combination, particularly on the first run of stickers, but I tried to cover my bases on common nongendered/third gender pronouns. I’m completely open to taking requests for additional stickers, though, and if I get enough requests for a particular pronoun set I’ll be glad to maker a sticker for it.

I’ll have these with me at SacAnime this weekend for 1/$0.50, 5/$2, and 10/$3. They’re currently available on my Storenvy at 5/$2 - I’ll be adding 10/$3 after the con, at the moment I just want to make sure I don’t run out as I’ve only printed up 160 of each design.